1062 Autumnwood Dr, Winnipeg, MB R2J 1C7  (204) 256-8792

Notes on the Notes – January 26, 2020

Guest Speaker:

Tammy Junghans from “Segue – Red Frogs”

Isaiah 9:1-4          Matthew 4:12-23

This week’s music:

“Who is a Disciple”

“Who is a disciple?  Look and you will see.
Those who follow Jesus learning what to be.
Mary Magdalene was one – she walked close by our Lord.
And was the first to find him ris’n on that Easter morn.

Who is a disciple?  Look and you will see.
Four strong men out fishing the Sea of Galilee.
Peter, Andrew, James and John left their nets behind
And followed Jesus just to know God’s love for humankind.

Who is a disciple?  Look and you will see.
A woman with a jar of oil anointing lovingly.
With tender tears she bathed his feet, gave love complete and bold.
And Jesus said, “Forever more your story will be told.”

Who is a disciple?  Look and you will see.
People all around us – they look like you and me.
When we learn to love and share, care for everyone,
We become disciples too,  and Jesus’ work is done. 

      Jesus, Jesus teach me how to be
      A disciple of your love
      For all the world to see.”

This catchy song was written by Jim Strathdee in 1990.  As we move through the season of Epiphany, we read in our scriptures about Jesus’ first disciples and note that they were all ordinary people who made the choice to follow Jesus.

Hear the song sung by Jim and Jean Strathdee at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4R1CIhT5gQ&list=OLAK5uy_kc8qUu61i9FaeC6GoRBdPp0Z-j27qJzss&index=7&t=0s

“Will You Come and Follow Me” (VU #567)

“Will you come and follow me if I but call your name?
Will you go where you don’t know and never be the same?
Will you let my love be shown, will you let my name be know,
Will you let my life be grown in you and you in me?…

This hymn, also known as “The Summons” was written by John Bell of the Iona Community.  The first four verses contain the questions that Jesus poses to us –

“Will you come and follow me if I but call your name?
Will you go where you don’t know and never be the same?
Will you let my love be shown, will you let my name be know,
Will you let my life be grown in you and you in me?

Will you leave yourself behind if I but call your name?
Will you care for cruel and kind and never be the same?
Will you risk the hostile stare should your life attract or scare?
Will you let me answer prayer in you and you in me?

Will you let the blinded see if I but call your name?
Will you set the prisoners free and never be the same?
Will you kiss the leper clean, and do such as this unseen,
And admit to what I mean in you and you in me?

Will you love the “you” you hide if I but call your name?
Will you quell the fear inside and never be the same?
Will you use the faith you’ve found to reshape the world around,
Through my sight and touch and sound in you and you in me?

Jesus’ questions involve taking personal risks as well as risks in the world as his followers.  Being a follower of Jesus also requires a change in us, both in attitude and in action.

The final verse of the hymn is our answer – our commitment to move forward with Christ and never be the same:

“Christ, your summons echoes true when you but call my name.
Let me turn and follow you and never be the same.
In your company I’ll go where your love and footsteps show.
Thus I’ll move and live and grow in you and you in me.”

The tune is the traditional Scottish tune KELINGROVE, which is the same tune as the hymn “Will You Come and See the Light” another hymn about making choices to follow Jesus, which we used in worship last week.

Hear the hymn sung by Robert Kochis at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0aAkOe87mo

“Christ Has No Body Now But Yours” (MV #171)

The words of this hymn were adapted by Stephen C. Warner in 2003 from the original poem by St. Teresa of Avila (1515-1582).  They challenge us to be Christ’s body in the world today, carrying on Jesus’ work of love, justice and compassion.

Christ has no body but yours.
Here on this earth, yours is the work, to serve with the joy of compassion.

No hands but yours to heal the wounded world,
no hands but yours to soothe all its suffering,
no touch but yours to bind the broken hope of the people of God.

No eyes but yours to see as Christ would see,
to find the lost, to gaze with compassion;
no eyes but yours to glimpse the holy joy of the city of God.

Christ-has-no-body-now-but-yoursNo feet but yours to journey with the poor, to walk this world with mercy and justice.
Yours are the steps to build a lasting peace for the children of God.

Through ev’ry gift, give back to those in need;
as Christ has blessed, so now be his blessing,
with ev’ry gift a benediction be to the people of God.”

Born in Spain, Teresa entered a Carmelite convent when she was eighteen, and later earned a reputation as a mystic, reformer, and writer who experienced divine visions. She founded a convent, and wrote the book The Way of Perfection for her nuns. The music used in More Voices was written in 2006 by Rick Gunn, a United Church musician from Bedford, Nova Scotia.

“God Works Through Us”

“God works through us and among us lives when we share gifts that the Spirit gives.
Though different skills may to each belong,
Like notes combined, we make a new song.

We plant the seed and we tend the earth, but God gives life and attends its birth.
The loaf we break and the cup we share remind us of the new life we bear.

Christ lays foundations on which we build;
Our efforts joined create hopes fulfilled.
Not walls that separate soul from soul,
But life in harmony is our goal.

Our ties are stronger than what divides;
In peace our common intent abides.
We’re called to forge a community;
In Christ we find a new unity.

We will work side by side,
And see our faith applied,
Letting the Spirit guide all that we do.”

This week’s anthem was written by Allan Baer in 2010.  He says, “Some of my songs take relatively little time to write. Others begin with a flourish of inspiration, but then annoying shortcomings emerge and won’t let go, even though they may be minor… That seems to highlight what happens as God is working through us – we take some enthusiastic steps forward, but then a disappointed step backwards. Our hope is that in the end, we are further ahead as we seek the peace and new life that can follow from applying one’s faith. We have been given the building blocks for that new life; now our challenge is to add to that foundation. Worrying that our efforts aren’t perfect the first time around isn’t helpful – our sense of perfection only seems to last until we hear what others think of what we’ve done! No wonder Christ suggested that we leave the perfect in God’s hands. In song, we have a reminder that so much of what needs to be done is only possible with the help of others. A song becomes just a scrap of paper if it is never sung by another. So let the life we build be a song of harmony, not discord. And building new life will take work; the courage to reassess what has been done; and the willingness to keep on singing.” (Source: https://www.crossroadsunited.ca/spirit/)

“Your Work, O God, Needs Many Hands” (VU #537)

“Your work, O God, needs many hands to help you everywhere,
And some there are who cannot serve unless our gifts we share.
Because we love you and your work, our offering now we make:
Be pleased to use it as your own, we ask for Jesus’ sake.”

Our offering response was written by Calvin Weiss Laufer in 1927, with music by Neil Dougall (1831).

“I’m Gonna Live So God Can Use Me” (VU #575)

“I’m gonna live so God can use me anywhere, Lord, any time.
I’m gonna work so God can use me anywhere, Lord, any time.
I’m gonna pray so God can use me anywhere, Lord, any time.
I’m gonna sing so God can use me anywhere, Lord, any time.”

This traditional African-American spiritual is from the Presbyterian Hymnal (1990).

To ponder:

Do we have to answer everyone who calls? 

How do we discern God’s call amid life’s many calls to us?

Jesus calling

Categories: Notes on the Notes