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Notes on the Notes – November 10, 2019

Remembrance Sunday 

Building Peace

    Haggai 1:15b-2:9                 Job 19:23-27a

This week’s music:

“Tribute to Veterans”

“We remember the years, we remember the tears.
We remember the cost, and the lives that were lost.
We will never forget. We remain in your debt.
As we sing, O Canada, we stand on guard for thee.

Many years have gone by since you served in this land.Lest-we-forget-2860992370-1572364124372.png
Many years have gone by since you felt the sea and sand.
Sailing on, flying high, marching on to victory
Guarding bravely what it means to be free.

There is no greater love than to lay down your life.
For your friends, family, and for all humanity.
Sacrifices were made and with blood, the price was paid.
Guarding bravely what it means to be free.

Men and women go on keeping order and peace
In a world torn by strife, and by conflict and pain.
And the story goes on in the loves of those who serve.
Guarding bravely what it means to be free.”

Doug Clorey wrote the song in 2004. When speaking about the song, he says, “I wrote the song in 2004, during the lead-up to the events marking the 60th anniversary of D-Day and the Battle of Normandy. At the time, I was working with Veterans Affairs Canada as the Department’s Director General of Canada Remembers, and was responsible for all of the events associated with marking this anniversary. The programming around marking this anniversary included events in Canada as well as an overseas event during which we travelled with a group of D-Day Veterans to Europe… In order to remain grounded, I always tried to remind myself of the reason for which we mark these anniversaries and why it is important for all Canadians to remember. As part of my own personal preparations, I began working on a song that would capture these sentiments. “Tribute to Veterans” was the result…

The refrain of the song allows the singer to pay tribute to those who served Canada and to assert that we will never forget. The first verse recalls the experience of those who served during D-Day and the Battle of Normandy…, while the second verse pays tribute to the immense sacrifice made by these brave men and women, to the point of laying down their lives… The third verse links up the past with the present, and points to the fact that “the story goes on” in the lives of the men and women who continue to serve in the Canadian Forces, “guarding bravely what it means to be free”….” (Source: http://www.legion.ca/media/tribute-to-veterans/)

Hear the song sung by Chiquesa by clicking below:

“Come to My Heart, Lord Jesus” (VU #661)

“Come to my heart, Lord Jesus; teach me to walk in your way.
Come to my heart, Lord Jesus; come to my heart today.
Give me the peace and joy that only you can bring.
Come to my heart, Lord Jesus; give me a song to sing.

heart-in-hand

Fill me with love, Lord Jesus;
Teach me to walk in your way.

Fill me with love, Lord Jesus;
Fill me with love today.

Give me the peace and joy
That only you can bring.

Fill me with love, Lord Jesus;
Give me a song to sing.

Answer my prayer, Lord Jesus; teach me to walk in your way.
Answer my prayer, Lord Jesus; answer my prayer today.
Give me the peace and joy that only you can bring.
Answer my prayer, Lord Jesus; give me a song to sing.”

This song was written by Joe Pinson in 1979.  It’s simple lyrics are an invitation for Jesus to be with us during this time of worship.

“Make Me a Channel of Your Peace” (VU #684)

“Make me a channel of your peace.
Where there is hatred, let me bring your love.
Where there is injury, your pardon, Lord,
And where there’s doubt, true faith in you.31925-15222-light-in-the-world.1200w.tn

Make me a channel of your peace.
Where there’s despair in life, let me bring hope.
Where there is darkness, only light,
And where there’s sadness, ever joy.

O Master, grant that I may never seek
So much to be consoled as to console,
To be understood as to understand,
To be loved, as to love with all my soul.

Make me a channel of your peace.
It is in pardoning that we are pardoned.
In giving of ourselves that we receive,
And in dying that we’re born to eternal life.”

The “Prayer of Saint Francis,” is a widely known Christian prayer for peace.  It has been attributed to St. Francis and was likely written around 1220, almost 700 years ago.  It has been frequently set to music by notable songwriters and quoted by prominent leaders, and its broadly inclusive language has found appeal with diverse faiths encouraging service to others.  The prayer was heavily publicized during both World War I and World War II.  The hymn is an anthem of the Royal British Legion and is often sung at Remembrance Day services.

Hear the song at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZI1Gst7pEqc

“Sing for Peace”

“Everything that has voice, sing for peace, speak for peace,
Given chance, given choice, work for peace, write for peace,
Resonating everywhere, echoing our common care;
Everything that has voice, sing for peace!

sing_peaceAll the world longs for peace, cries for peace, dies for peace;
Let the children, every place sleep in peace, grow in peace,
Home and country safe to be where the Spirit rises free;
All the world longs for peace, cries for peace.

Everyone who has breath, you and I, passersby,
Every tenant of the earth, plant for peace, gather peace,
Cultivate a neighbourhood cherishing our neighbour’s good;
Everyone who has breath, live in peace.
Everyone who has breath, live in peace.”

The beautiful text for “Sing for Peace” was created by Shirley Erena Murray, a hymn text writer from New Zealand, known for her strong and compassionate words for peace-making and issues of social justice. The text was written in 2003 and set to music by Marty Haugen in 2014.

“From a Distance”

“From a distance the world looks blue and green
And the snow-capped mountains white.
From a distance the ocean meets the stream
And the eagle takes to flight.

From a distance there is harmony and it echoes through the land.
It’s the voice of hope,
It’s the voice of peace,
It’s the voice of every man.

From a distance we all have enough
And no-one is in need
There are no guns, no bombs, no disease.
No hungry mouths to feed.

From a distance, we are instruments marching in a common band.
Playing songs of hope,
Playing songs of peace,
They’re the songs of every man.

God is watching us,
God is watching us, God is watching us
From a distance.

From a distance you look like my friend
Even though we are at war.
From a distance I just can’t comprehend
What all this fighting’s for.

From a distance there is harmony
And it echoes through the land.
It’s the hope of hopes,
It’s the love of loves,
It’s the heart of every man.
It’s the hope of hopes,
It’s the love of loves,
It’s the song of every man. earth from space

And God is watching us,
God is watching us,
God is watching us
From a distance.
Oh, God is watching us
God is watching,
God is watching us
From a distance.”

This song was written in 1985 by singer-songwriter Julie Gold.  Hear her speak about and sing the song at:  https://youtu.be/nK_21TOmrDA

In 1987, Irish singer Nanci Griffith was the first person to record the song. Hear her version at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCzORgC1NpM

The song became an international commercial success after it was recorded in 1990 by Bette Midler. Much of the song’s popularity coincided with the first Persian Gulf War.  Hear Bette Midler’s version at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UoBFfIkvHvc

“Make Our Lives a Prayer of Peace”

“Grant us, O Lord, peace in our days,
Peace in our hearts, peace in our families,
Peace in our country, peace among nations.
Make our lives a prayer of peace for the world.

Help us act in justice and to love tenderly,
And to walk humbly with our God.

Help us to forgive, and to seek forgiveness,
Help us rid ourselves of pride.

Help us live more simply by accepting what we have.
Give us everything we need.

Help us be content and be faithful to your word;
Guide our journey with your peace.

Grant us, O Lord, peace in our days,
Peace in our hearts, peace in our families,
Peace in our country, peace among nations.
Make our lives a prayer of peace for the world.
Make our lives a prayer of peace for the world.”

This song was written by Paul Hillebrand in 1991, during the Gulf War.   The words of the chorus form a litany, or series of petitions in prayer to God, encompassing so many areas in our lives that need the peace of God.  The verses give us a challenge of how to be people of peace through forgiveness, simplicity, and contentment.

Hear the song at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VIA_8gMiYrU

“Let There Be Peace on Earth”

Let there be peace

Sy Miller and Jill Jackson were a husband and wife songwriting team. In 1955 they wrote a song about their dream of peace for the world and how they believed each one of us could help create it.    Sy Miller wrote in his own words about the creation of the song: “One summer evening in 1955, a group of 180 teenagers of all races and religions, meeting at a workshop high in the California mountains locked arms, formed a circle and sang a song of peace. They felt that singing the song, with its simple basic sentiment – ‘Let there be peace on earth and let it begin with me,’ helped to create a climate for world peace and understanding. ‘When they came down from the mountain, these inspired young people brought the song with them and started sharing it. And, as though on wings, ‘Let There Be Peace on Earth’ began an amazing journey around the globe. It travelled first, of course, with the young campers back to their homes and schools, churches and clubs. Soon the circle started by the teenagers began to grow…It was taped, recorded, copied, printed in songbooks, and passed by word of mouth.”

Hear the song sung at Voices Without Borders at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MO5CqyMPL8Q

To ponder: 

What rebuilding is God calling us to work together on?

red_poppy_field_of_poppies_poppies

 

 

Categories: Notes on the Notes