1062 Autumnwood Dr, Winnipeg, MB R2J 1C7  (204) 256-8792

Notes on the Notes – March 13, 2016

Lent 5

Hungering and Thirsting for Community

 platesThis week’s scripture readings:

Psalm 126,  Philippians 3:4b-14

This week’s music:

“Part of the Family” (VU #395)

“Come in, come in and sit down,church-family-images-_4440318_orig
You are a part of the family.
We are lost and we are found,
And we are a part of the family.

You know the reason why you came,
Yet no reason can explain;
So share in the laughter and cry in the pain,
For we are a part of the family.

God is with us in this place,
Like a mother’s warm embrace.
We’re all forgiven by God’s grace,
For we are a part of the family.

There’s life to be shared in the bread and the wine,
We are the branches, Christ is the vine.
This is God’s temple, it’s not yours or mine,
But we are a part of the family.

There’s rest for the weary and health for us all;
There’s a yoke that is easy, and a burden that’s small.
So come in and worship and answer the call,
For we are a part of the family.”

This family song became known to United Church congregations in the arrangement made by Darryl Nixon for the hymn book supplement Songs for a Gospel People (1987). Singer songwriter James K. Manley, the composer of this hymn, is a minister in the United Church of Christ (USA). “Part of the Family” reminds both members and visitors that our congregation is an open, diverse group that welcomes people of all ages, every marital status, and all views, interest levels, and stages in the faith journey.

“God You Meet Us”

“God, you meet us in our weakness,
Giving strength beyond our own,
By your Spirit, by your people,
Showing we are not alone.
 
God, you meet us in our sorrows
With the comfort of your voice,
by your Spirit, by your people,
Helping crying hearts rejoice.
 
God, you meet us in our neighbours,
When your strength and voice they need.
Yours the Spirit, we your people,
Sharing love in word and deed!”

This hymn of community is found in the United Church Hymn book supplement Songs for a Gospel People.  The words are by Glen W. Baker (1976).  The lyrics are set to a tune by Johann L. Stainer (1735), commonly known as the tune for the hymn There’s a Wideness in God’s Mercy.  

“Here is the Church”

“If you are searching for a place to belong,
I know a house where you can go.
A special family will welcome you there
In a home where love can grow.

Here’s the church,Here-is-the-church-Finger-Rhyme
Here’s the steeple,
Open the doors,
See all the people.
Share the love,
Feel the Spirit,
Here’s the church,
Here is the church.

Come, kingdom seekers to the end of your quest,
And enter in this house of prayer.
This place of gathering where all will be blessed,
This home where fellowship is shared….”

This week, the Worship Choir, Praise Singers and Joyful Noise will join together to sing this anthem.  It was written by Kerry Pryor and Douglas Nolan (1999).  The choreography includes the actions for the old English children’s rhyme “Here is the church,”  which references the popular style of church architecture in London.

“There’s a Quiet Understanding”

There’s a quiet understanding when we’re gathered in the Spirit,
It’s a promise Jesus gives us when we gather in his name;

There’s a love we feel in Jesus, there’s a manna that he feeds us,
It’s a promise Jesus gives us when we gather in his name.

And we know when we’re together, sharing love and understanding,
That our brothers and our sisters feel the oneness Jesus brings

Thank you, Jesus, thank you Jesus, for the way you love and feed us,
For the many ways you lead us; thank you gracious Lord.
Thank you gracious Lord.”

This hymn of community was written by Tedd Smith in 1973. It was published in the United Church Hymn Book supplement, Songs for a Gospel People.  Born in London, Ontario, Canada, Tedd Smith moved to the United States and became an American citizen. As pianist for The Billy Graham Crusades for some thirty-five years, he traveled the world with Mr. Graham, participating in almost all of his meetings. He was educated at The Royal Conservatory of Music (Toronto), The University of Minnesota, and the Catholic University (Washington, DC).

For a true 70s interpretation of the song go to: https://youtu.be/VeOsZHJjHbA

“Pray for the People

“Pray for the person on your left.
Pray for the person on your right.
They may seem strong, but we don’t know
All of the struggles and the burdens they hold.
We pray, Lord, we pray
Give them power to face the day.

Lord, we lift them up,
Lord, we lift them up.
They try to be strong,
But only you know
All of the struggles and the burdens they hold.
We pray, Lord, we pray
Give them power to face the day.

Now we pray, “Lord, have mercy.”
Now we pray, “Won’t you bless them, Lord.”

Pray for the person on your left.
Pray for the person on your right.
Pray for them and as you do,
People all around are praying for you.
We pray, Lord, we pray
Give us power to face the day.
Amen, amen.”

This week’s anthem by Pepper Choplin (2008) reminds us of the power of prayer and the comfort of community.

“Draw the Circle Wide” (MV #145)

“Draw the circle wide.  Draw it wider still.
Let this be our song, no one stands alone, standing side by side,
Draw the circle wide.

God the still-point of the circle,
‘Round whom all creation turns;

nothing lost, but held forever,circle wide
In God’s gracious arms.

Let our hearts touch far horizons,
So encompass great and small;

Let our loving know no borders,
Faithful to God’s call.

Let the dreams we dream be larger
Than we’ve ever dreamed before;

Let the dream of Christ be in us,
Open every door.”

This now-familiar hymn of inclusion was written by Gordon Light of the Common Cup Company in 1994.  It was arranged by Michael Bloss in 1998.

 

 

Categories: Notes on the Notes