1062 Autumnwood Dr, Winnipeg, MB R2J 1C7  (204) 256-8792

Notes on the Notes – January 29, 2017

This week’s theme:

Turning it all on its head

This week’s scripture readings:

Micah 6:1-8    Matthew 5:1-12

This week’s music:

“Lord, Prepare Me”  (MV #18)

Lord, Prepare meLord, prepare me to be a sanctuary
Pure and holy, tried and true
With thanksgiving, I’ll be a living
Sanctuary for you.”

This song of preparation for prayer was written by John W. Thompson and Randy Scruggs in 1982.    The lyrics of “Sanctuary” are a simple request for God to purify oneself. In addition to calling on God, it is implied that one must take some step to be purified. The end result is that a person will be a living sanctuary for God. This powerful song has impacted people for over thirty years, and it is sure to continue on this path for years to come. To listen to this song go to:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LiTy7nd

 “Everlasting God”

 “Strength will rise as we wait upon the LordWait-on-the-Lord-Scripture-Isaiah-_art
We will wait upon the Lord
We will wait upon the Lord

O God, You reign forever
Our hope, our Strong Deliverer

You are the everlasting God
The everlasting God
You do not faint
You won’t grow weary
You’re the defender of the weak
You comfort those in need
You lift us up on wings like eagles”

This song was written by Brenton Brown and Ken Riley in 2005.  It is based on Isaiah 40.  Hear the song at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGPTK24hQxc

“We are Called”

“Come! Live in the light!
Shine with the joy and the love of the Lord!
We are called to be light for the kingdom,
To live in the freedom of the city of God.
Come! Open your heart!
Show your mercy to all those in fear!
We are called to be hope for the hopeless
So hatred and blindness will be no more.

Sing! Sing a new song!
Sing of that great day when all will be one!
God will reign, and we’ll walk with each other
As sisters and brothers united in love.

We are called to act with justice,Micah 8
We are called to love tenderly;
We are called to serve one another,
To walk humbly with God.”

This song, based on the reading from Micah, was written by David Haas in 1988. “We are called” (1988) captures the energy and enthusiasm of the folk song style. Each of the three stanzas exhorts the singer with an imperative verb: “Come! Live in the light!” “Come! Open your heart!” “Sing! Sing a new song!” Folk songs, especially those growing out of the 1960s and 1970s, urge us to action. The action here is inspired by Micah 6:8: “. . . what the Lord really wants from you: He wants you to promote justice, to be faithful, and to live obediently before your God” (NET).

The first stanza invites us to “Live in the light” of God’s grace and freedom and to reflect that light with “joy and . . . love.” Stanza two, following naturally in the spirit of the first stanza, invites us to “Open our hearts” to “mercy” for all who live in “fear,” “hatred,” and “blindness.” The final stanza invites us to an eschatological vision of the future when “all will be one!” (Source:  Discipleship Ministries – The United Methodist Church)

See the song sung by the Notre Dame Folk Choir:

 “Blest are They”

“Blest are they, the poor in spirit, theirs is the kingdom of God.
Blest are they, full of sorrow, they shall be consoled.

Blest are they, the lowly ones, they shall inherit the earth.
Blest are they who hunger and thirst; they shall have their fill.

Blest are they who show mercy, mercy shall be theirs.
Blest are they, the pure of heart, they shall see God!

Blest are they who seek peace; they are the children of God.be_atitudes
Blest are they who suffer in faith, the glory of God is theirs.

Blest are you who suffer hate, all because of me.
Rejoice and be glad, yours is the kingdom;
Shine for all to see.

Rejoice! and be glad!
Blested are you, holy are you!
Rejoice! and be glad!
Yours is the kingdom of God!”

This song, also by David Haas, with Michael Joncas, is a setting of The Beatitudes from the Sermon on the Mount in the Gospel of Matthew.  The Beatitudes are one of the most beloved sections of New Testament scripture, and offer many messages and challenges for the believer:  messages of comfort and reflection on the lifestyle of one seeking to build the kingdom.

Hear a youth choir singing they hymn at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vudWaeZbl4g

“Turning of the World” 

“Let us sing this song for the turning of the world
That we may turn as one
With every voice, with every song, we will move this world along
And our lives will feel the echo of our turning.

With every voice, with every song
Oh, we will move this world along
With every voice, with every song, we will move this world along
And our lives will feel the echo of our turning.

 Let us sing this song for the healing of the world
That we may heal as one
With every voice, with every song, we will move this world along
And our lives will feel the echo of our healing.

 With every voice, with every song
Oh, we will move this world along
With every voice, with every song, we will move this world along
And our lives will feel the echo of our healing.

 Let us sing this song for the loving of the world
That we may love as one
With every voice, with every song, we will move this world alongupside-down
And our lives will feel the echo of our loving.

 With every voice, with every song
Oh, we will move this world along
With every voice, with every song, we will move this world along
And our lives will feel the echo of our loving.

 Let us sing this song for the turning of the world
That we may turn as one
With every voice, with every song, we will move this world along
And our lives will feel the echo of our turning.

 With every voice, with every song
Oh, we will move this world along
With every voice, with every song, we will move this world along
And our lives will feel the echo of our turning.
And our lives will feel the echo of our healing.
And our lives will feel the echo of our loving.
And our lives will feel the echo of our turning.”

This song was written in 1982 by Ruth Pelham.  Ruth wrote “Turning of the World” at the height of the anti-nuke movement as a musical way for people to affirm the positive power of us working together for peace and justice in our local and global communities. Singers can easily make up their own words by simply changing the word “turning” to “loving” or “healing” or whatever other concepts ring most relevant.

When Ruth introduces this song to children or adults, she says: “I wrote this song one morning right after I woke up from a dream. This song is about unity, and people working together to build a safe and peaceful world. The dream of peace is not just a dream of mine. It is shared by millions of people of every age, culture, religion, and background, and is the glue that holds us together as one humanity.”

“A great thing about being alive in these times is that millions of people all over the world are doing things to bring about peace. In every country, people are working alone or in groups to make our world better, and to assure that each of us has our basic needs met for food, clothing, shelter, and safety. Every day brings us closer to realizing this dream, and each one of us can help to make that happen. When we work together in large numbers, the results can be awesome.”  (Source:  Pass it on!  The Journal of the Children’s Music Network)

Hear an international children’s choir sing the song at:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3RCINFpKP8

“Thank You for the Love”

“Thank you for the love that’s in this place;
Thank you for the joy in every face.
Thank you for awakening just begun;
Thank you for you steadfast presence, O Holy One.”

The words for our offering response were written by Dale Skinner and Donald Patriquin, with music by Donald Patriquin (2015).

“Lead Us Out” 

“Lead us up. We want to know You better.
Lead us up. Fill our hearts and make us more life You.
Lead us up. Ever growing closer.
Oh lead us up into You, Lord.

Lead us up, lead us in, lead us out into Your world.
Lead us now, and we’ll follow you today.
Lead us onward by Your grace, until we see Your face.
Lead us out into Your world.

Lead us in. We want to love like You do.
Lead us in. Make of us one body in Your love.
Lead us in. Loving one another.
Oh lead us in Your love, O Lord.

Lead us up, lead us in, lead us out into Your world.
Lead us now, and we’ll follow you today.
Lead us onward by Your grace, until we see Your face.
Lead us out into Your world.

Lead us out. We want to be a blessing.
Lead us out into the world You gave Your life to save.
Lead us out to tell them all about You.
Oh lead us out into Your world.

Lead us up, lead us in, lead us out into Your world.
Lead us now, and we’ll follow you today.
Lead us onward by Your grace, until we see Your face.
Lead us out into Your world.”

This song, by Michael A. Schmid, was written in 2008.  The song was written for the new vision statement of the congregation he serves, St. John’s Lutheran Church in Napa, CA.  The three parts of the Vision (Lead us up, lead us in, lead us out) refer to God’s call to be in growing relationships with God, with other followers of Jesus, and with he world that we’re trying to reach.  Of ultimate importance is God’s mission through the church.  In that sense, He leads us up and in, so that He might lead us out. 

“What Does the Lord Require of You?” (VU #701)

What does the Lord require of you?Micah

Justice, kindness, walk humbly with your God.

To seek justice, and love kindness,
And walk humbly with your God.”

“What does the Lord require of you?” is a Scripture song based on Micah 6:8. The three melodies interlock, creating beautiful harmony while reinforcing the message.  It was written by Jim Strathdee in 1986.

Categories: Notes on the Notes